Put Salt on Facebook

Put Salt on Facebook
This entry is part 3 of 3 in the series Admin

NOTE: Facebook does not display posts from this site!

Please SHARE “Salt” articles on Facebook 

Most people are unaware that the articles posted on our pages do NOT get displayed to everyone! A recent post of mine showed that it was seen by exactly ONE PERSON – ME, evidently! That is not the way FB started out but it is the way that Facebook is FORCING page owners to pay for advertising our pages. Either I pay, or my posts don’t get displayed.

I believe that the articles of the “Prophecy with a pinch of salt” book will be of great interest and value to my friends and their friends – and beyond! We just have to get the message to them.

Promoting pages on Facebook

salt on facebook or twitter

“Promoting” is Facebook’s term for PAYING to get your post or page displayed to more people. 

So far, I have spent almost $30 of my own money trying to advertise the Prophecy with Salt page on Facebook, and gotten very little results. As reported today (see the image to the right), For $25.81, I have gotten almost nothing. Although over 4,100 people POTENTIALLY saw the advertisement, only 61 people actually clicked on it. That works out to costing me $.42 a click!!

And, even though we increased the number of likes by 19, ALL of those likes came from our friends and their friends! NOT a single Page Like came from the ad!!

So, I need your help. Would you SHARE some of our posts with your friends on Facebook? Share the articles that you feel would be of interest to your friends (probably NOT this one). Posts such as our TIMELINE article deserve widespread sharing! Such personal sharing (& commenting) does more to spread the message than anything else. And, it will save me a few of my (very limited) personal dollars.

At the bottom of each article are sharing buttons for the major social media sites. Just click a button and follow the instructions! Simple!! (Works best if you are already logged in to the social media site.)

While you are at it, be sure to LIKE this site by clicking the FACEBOOK widget in the sidebar (or at the bottom of the page on mobile devices.)

Using Context in the Bible

Using Context in the Bible
This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series How to Study the Bible

Context in the Bible

Facebook includes lots of images (memes) showing encouraging Scriptures from the Bible. Most are accurate quotes of a verse but is the concept they suggest Biblically sound? What about the people who quote a single scripture as a “proof” of some doctrine? Is that proper? What could be wrong if they have a Scripture to back them up? To find out, we need to learn how to  “correctly handle the word of truth.” Read the entire second chapter of 2 Timothy to learn more:

2 Timothy 2:15, Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a worker who does not need to be ashamed and who correctly handles the word of truth.

There are some defined rules for studying the Bible. Dr Tremper Longman III has posted his “Seven Keys to Understanding Scripture” while Ron Rhodes and Richard Anthony have “Eight Rules of Bible Interpretation.” Both of these lists (and many others) are great tools for guiding us in the proper methods of studying God’s Word. Although there might be slight differences of opinion between the lists, one thing that is common in virtually every guide is to consider the CONTEXT of each verse.

Google’s definition of context:

con·text ˈkäntekst/  noun
1) the circumstances that form the setting for an event, statement, or idea, and in terms of which it can be fully understood and assessed.
2) the parts of something written or spoken that immediately precede and follow a word or passage and clarify its meaning.

When reading a verse of Scripture, we must consider the verses prior to and following the verse – and how that concept is covered in other parts of the  Bible. Rarely can a verse stand on its own without us having to weigh the other verses in the chapter where it is found. And, always, a verse must be taken in the broader context of the entire Bible. If a verse seems to “conflict” with other verses, we must try to ascertain why and attempt to resolve the difference.

Look at Matthew 4:6 (the temptation of Jesus), Keep reading →